New cancer diagnostic technique debuts

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female researcher bwCANCER cells break down sugars and produce the metabolic acid lactate at a much higher rate than normal cells.

This phenomenon provides a telltale sign that cancer is present, via diagnostics such as PET scans, and possibly offers an avenue for novel cancer therapies.

Now a team of Chilean researchers at The Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECs), with the collaboration of Carnegie’s Wolf Frommer, has devised a molecular sensor that can detect levels of lactate in individual cells in real time.

Prior to this advance, no other measurement method could non-invasively detect lactate in real time at the single-cell level.

The work, published in the open access journal PLOS ONE, is a boon to understanding how different types of cells go awry when cancer hits.

“Over the last decade, the Frommer lab at Carnegie has pioneered the use of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer, or FRET, sensors to measure the concentration and flow of sugars in individual cells with a simple fluorescent color change. This has started to revolutionize the field of cell metabolism,” explained CECs researcher Alejandro San Martín, lead author of the article…Read more

Source: http://ecancer.org/news

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