Browsing: COVID-19 Pandemic

Largest study of cancer patients with COVID-19 provides guidance on how to protect this vulnerable population People with cancer who develop COVID-19 are much more likely to die from the disease than those without cancer, according to physician-researchers at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA. The study, published in the online edition of Cancer Discovery, is the largest so far to assess outcomes for patients with cancer who have also been infected with COVID-19. “Our findings emphasise the need to prevent cancer patients from contracting COVID-19 and – if they do – to identify and closely monitor…

Medical images for a wide range of diseases, including COVID-19, can now be more easily viewed, compared, and analyzed using a breakthrough web-based imaging platform developed by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), USA, and collaborating researchers. The Open Health Imaging Foundation (OHIF) web viewer was originally developed with grant support from the National Cancer Institute’s Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (NCI-ITCR) program for use in cancer imaging research and clinical trials, where it is already adopted by several leaders in the field. However, the OHIF Viewer and its underlying Cornerstone libraries and tools can also be used for any disease and…

As the UK government looks for an exit strategy to Britain’s COVID-19 lockdown a nanomedicine expert from The University of Manchester believes a care model usually applied to cancer patients could provide a constructive way forward. Kostas Kostarelos, is Professor of Nanomedicine at the University of Manchester, UK, and is leading the Nanomedicine Lab, which is part of the National Graphene Institute and the Manchester Cancer Research Centre. The Manchester-based expert believes more scientific research should be employed as we transform how we view the COVID-19 pandemic, or any future virus outbreak, and deal with it more like a chronic…

A new expert panel consensus statement published simultaneously today in the journals Radiology: Imaging Cancer, Chest and the Journal of the American College of Radiology provides guidance to clinicians managing lung cancer screening programs and patients with lung nodules during the COVID-19 pandemic. In many parts of the world, the COVID-19 public health crisis has stressed the health care system close to or even past its breaking point. Hospital resources are focused on the immediate needs of patients suffering from the disease, particularly those who are critically ill. The strain on health care systems and the need to control the virus using containment and…

Thousands of cancer patients in the UK have had their treatment stopped or delayed because of COVID-19, and with pressures mounting on the health service, Cancer Research UK calls for widespread testing to prevent unnecessary cancer deaths. The global pandemic has caused enormous disruption to cancer services across the country including delays to cancer treatment, screening and diagnosis, and profound decreases in patients being urgently referred to hospital with suspected cancer symptoms. In some cases, already overstretched NHS staff are being directed away from cancer care, towards caring for COVID-19 patients. And in other cases, where a cancer patient might…

Netherlands Cancer Institute, Cancer Research UK Cambridge Centre and five other leading European cancer centres share knowledge and experiences to define new guidelines for treating cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic In this joint effort, the centres offer guidance to institutions globally by outlining their general consensus measures and organisational strategies adopted to make their operations “pandemic proof”. In the space of just a few weeks, the European cancer centres have had to drastically revise and reorganise their patient care and scientific research due to the coronavirus crisis. For example, treatments have been postponed or adjusted to protect the immune…

By Professor Gordon C Wishart, Chief Medical Officer at Check4Cancer, Visiting Professor of Cancer Surgery at Anglia Ruskin School of Medicine • The NHS and private sector need to work together nationwide, to deliver urgent access to cancer diagnosis and treatment • Death rates of cancer patients will increase if private hospital resources are not fully utilised during and after the COVID-19 pandemic • Access to cancer services must be increased during the lockdown period if we are to avoid a rise in cancer deaths in the UK • ONS data currently shows increases in non COVID-19 related death rates during the…

A New Paradigm – Keeping Patients Safe From Huge Competing Risks of Death In today’s edition of The Oncology Podcast, Rachael Babin talks to Professor Eva Segelov about COVID-19 and how it will impact oncology services. Professor Eva Segelov is a Medical Oncologist and is Director of Oncology at Monash University and Monash Health, Melbourne, Victoria, previously Senior Medical Oncologist at St Vincent’s Hospital, St Vincent’s Private Hospital and St Vincent’s Clinic and Associate Professor of Medicine, University of New South Wales. Eva is lead author of the paper Practical considerations for the management of cancer patients during the…

As the coronavirus pandemic triggers greater isolation measures, thousands of children with cancer and their families have been forgotten. Redkite, Australia’s leading children’s cancer support organisation, is hearing from families from all walks of life who are now experiencing unprecedented levels of distress caused by COVID-19, with the life of their immunocompromised child under greater threat than ever before. Redkite’s CEO, Monique Keighery, said these families were the unseen collateral damage of the virus and that Redkite’s counselling service, delivered by telephone, video and email, was one of the few places left these forgotten families could turn to when other…

An international panel of cancer experts has recommended a one-week course of radiotherapy and delaying surgery as the best way to treat patients with bowel cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. The short course of treatment involves higher-intensity radiation rather than five weeks of radiotherapy coupled with chemotherapy. Surgery, which normally happens one to two weeks after radiotherapy, can be safely delayed by up to 12 weeks, say the expert panel. This approach, based on the latest research evidence, will maintain the best chance of successfully treating the disease while at the same time reducing the side effects of treatment and…

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