Browsing: COVID-19 Pandemic

Urgent investment is needed in advanced forms of radiotherapy so the high-tech treatment can play a central role in clearing the backlog in NHS cancer care that has built up during the pandemic in the UK. Leading cancer experts are calling for the British Government to address gaps in funding for high-precision radiotherapy and to do more to overcome the public’s scepticism of radiotherapy as an ‘outdated’ form of treatment. Experts believe NHS patients are missing out on potentially life-saving treatments that could play a huge role in coping with the pressures of the pandemic, because of under-investment in new…

Most people with cancer who are infected by the novel coronavirus produce antibodies at a rate comparable to the rest of the population-but their ability to do so depends on their type of cancer and the treatments they’ve received, according to a new study by researchers at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA. The findings, published online in Nature Cancer, may lead to better care for cancer patients, who face a heightened risk of dying from COVID-19, and suggests that cancer patients should respond well to COVID-19 vaccines. “We conducted the study out of our concern that…

US screenings for breast cancer and colon cancer dropped dramatically during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, but use of the procedures returned to near-normal levels by the end of July 2020, according to a new study. Analysing insurance claims from more than 6 million Americans with private health coverage, researchers found that mammography rates among women aged 45 to 64 declined by 96% during March and April 2020 as compared to January and February. Similarly, the weekly rate of colorectal cancer screenings among adults aged 45 to 64 and older declined by 95% during the period. By the…

With Australia’s COVID-19 vaccination program now underway, people affected by cancer have questions about the vaccines. To help provide some answers, Peter Mac has produced a video message and compiled a list of frequently asked questions, with answers based on current information and available evidence. Read the frequently asked questions here or download the FAQs document. Note that this information is general only, and is not a substitute for individual medical advice. Always seek the guidance of your doctor or specialist regarding your personal medical circumstances. For more information Visit the Australian Department of Health COVID-19 vaccine webpage View the Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre’s Frequently Asked…

The COVID-19 pandemic has had major impacts on childhood cancer care worldwide, according to a survey of more than 300 clinicians from 200 hospitals worldwide published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal. The first global assessment of the impact of COVID-19 on paediatric cancer care reveals that paediatric cancer care was affected at more than three quarters of surveyed hospitals (78%). Almost half (43%) reported diagnosing fewer new cases than expected, while around one third (34%) reported a rise in the number of patients who abandoned treatment. The survey also found that nearly one in ten (7%) closed their paediatric…

An open-access article in ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) describes the clinical and imaging features of axillary adenopathy detected during screening or diagnostic breast imaging after recent coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccination to inform the development of follow-up recommendations. Shabnam Mortazavi of the University of California at Los Angeles, USA, reviewed electronic medical records to identify women with post-COVID-19 vaccination adenopathy found from December 2020 to February 2021. For mammography, Mortazavi considered a node abnormal when its size, shape, or density was deemed disproportionate to other axillary nodes (ipsilateral or contralateral). On ultrasound, she deemed a node abnormal based on subjective assessment…

Researchers have called on European policymakers to make adequate resources available to tackle pancreatic cancer, a disease that is almost invariably fatal and where little progress has been made over the past 40 years. In the latest predictions for cancer deaths in the EU and UK for 2021, published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology today (Monday), researchers led by Carlo La Vecchia (MD), a professor at the University of Milan (Italy), say that pancreatic death rates are predicted to remain approximately stable for men, but continue to rise in women in most EU countries. The researchers predict that 42,300…

While the COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on all aspects of life, it has been particularly disruptive for the treatment of children and young people with cancer, according to a review published in ecancermedicalscience, an open access cancer journal focused on under-resourced communities. “Unlike a medical emergency where a life may be saved immediately, saving the life of a child with cancer is a marathon, not a sprint,” state the authors, led by Professor Kathy Pritchard-Jones, President of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP), Steinhausen, Switzerland and Professor of Paediatric Oncology at UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of…

Australian cancer clinicians welcome a new resource to guide them through changes in practice brought about by a new emphasis on telehealth. Telehealth has reached new heights since the beginning of the COVID-19 global pandemic, with fresh uptake of new technologies and solutions to ensure patient safety. A new paper, ‘Telehealth in cancer care: during and beyond the COVID‐19 pandemic’ published in Internal Medicine Journal on February 11th, 2021, explores the rapid uptake of telehealth in cancer care. The authors argue many of the changes made in routine clinical practice could be embedded beyond the duration of the pandemic. The paper…

A new study on the effect of lockdowns on cancer diagnoses has found an 18.2% reduction in new cancer diagnoses and an overall 6.8% increase in Stage 4 cancers in the UK since March 2020 when compared to 2019. The study was published in ecancermedicalscience and led by researchers at King’s College London, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK, and the Tata Memorial Cancer Centre, Mumbai, India.  The authors studied the rate of diagnosis within the area covered by the South East London Cancer Alliance, covering a population of around two…

1 2 3 11