Australian research unearths new treatment hope

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Stomach cancer_oncologynews_800x500A new cancer-fighting medicine has shown the ability to extend the lives of people with one of the most deadly forms of gastro-intestinal cancer, according to Australian-led research presented at ASCO, the world’s largest cancer meeting in Chicago.

Experts from the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group (AGITG) who conceived, designed and led the ground-breaking INTEGRATE study have told the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conference that a medicine known as regorafenib can suppress the growth of tumours in patients with cancer of the stomach and oesophagus/stomach junction that has progressed after surgery and chemotherapy.

Associate Professor Nick Pavlakis, INTEGRATE study lead investigator and oncologist at Sydney’s Royal North Shore Hospital said, “The results are extremely promising for patients with cancer of the stomach and oesophagus/stomach junction who have failed chemotherapy and have no other approved treatment options”.

In the trial of 152 patients with advanced cancer of the stomach and oesophagus/stomach junction, two thirds of patients were treated with regorafenib tablets, resulting in a significant suppression of tumour growth by 60% compared with patients receiving placebo, and a 26% improvement in overall survival time.

The Phase II INTEGRATE study was conducted across 28 trial centres in Australia and another 29 sites in New Zealand and parts of Asia.

The Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group are now preparing for a major international Phase III clinical trial of regorafenib in 460 patients with advanced cancer of the stomach and oesophagus/stomach junction that has returned after surgery and become resistant to chemotherapy.

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The ONA Editor curates oncology news, views and reviews from Australia and around the world for our readers. In aggregated content, original sources will be acknowledged in the article footer.

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